Autumn Harvest (Part 4)

A week later and it’s even cooler in Iowa! Our high today is 63! Woo hoo! Jacob and I have started keeping the windows open all the time. It is so nice to have cooler weather, colorful leaves, and crisp mornings.

Another bonus to autumn is the start of stew and soup season! Many people have stopped and asked me why I go through the trouble of making my own stock. First, if you make a big batch and freeze it, you may save some money. But the main reason is that you’ll get a richness of flavor and texture in your homemade stock that you just can’t buy at the store. And further, there are absolutely no additives – NO added sodium, NO gluten, MSG, or other strange additives. And an extra bonus … it makes the house smell good.

Beef Broth
4-6 pounds meaty beef stock bones (with lots of marrow), including some knuckle bones if possible
1/2 to 1 pound of stew meat (chuck or flank steak) and/or beef scraps, cut into 2-inch chunks (optional)
Canola oil
1-2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
1-2 large carrots, cut into 1-2 inch segments
2-3 cloves of garlic, unpeeled
Handful of parsley, stems and leaves
Rosemary, stems and leaves (optional)
1-2 bay leaves
10-15 peppercorns

Preheat oven to 400°F. Rub a little oil over the stew meat pieces, carrots, and onions. Place stock bones, stew meat or beef scraps, carrots and onions in a large, shallow roasting pan. Roast in oven for about 45 minutes, turning the bones and meat pieces half-way through the cooking, until nicely browned. This process is called caramelization. Caramelizing of both the bones and the vegetables will create a more complex and robust stock. Without caramelization, the stock will have a very murky look and muddy tasteIf bones begin to char at all during this cooking process, lower the heat. They should brown, not burn.

When the bones and meat are nicely browned, remove them and the vegetables and place them in a large (12 to 16 quart) stock pot. Place the roasting pan on the stove-top on low heat (will cover 2 burners), pour 1/2 cup to a cup of hot water over the pan and use a metal spatula to scrape up all of the browned bits stuck to the bottom of the pan. Pour the browned bits and water into the stock pot.

Add garlic, parsley, rosemary, bay leaves, and peppercorns to the stock pot. Fill the stock pot with cold water, to 1 to 2 inches over the top of the bones. Put the heat on high and bring the pot to a low simmer and then reduce the heat to low. If you have a candy or meat thermometer, the temperature of the water should be between 180° and 200°F (boiling is 212°F). The stock should be at a bare simmer, just a bubble or two coming up here and there. (You may need to put the pot on your smallest burner on the lowest temp, or if you are using an oven-safe pot, place it in the oven at 190°F.) Cover the pot loosely and let simmer low and slow for 3-6 hours. Do not stir the stock while cooking. Stirring will mix the fats in with the stock, clouding up the stock.

As the stock cooks, fat will be released from the bone marrow and stew meat and rise to the top. From time to time check in on the stock and use a large metal spoon to scoop away the fat and any scum that rises to the surface. (Do not put this fat down your kitchen drain by the way. It will solidify and block your pipes. Put it in a bowl or jar to save for cooking or to discard.)

At the end of cooking time (when you want to end the cooking is up to you, 3 hours minimum, 6 to 8 hours if you can do it) use tongs or a slotted spoon to gently remove the bones and vegetables from the pot (discard them, though if you see a chunk of marrow, taste it, it’s delicious). Line another large pot (8-quart) with a fine mesh sieve, covered with a couple layers of cheesecloth if you have it. Pour the stock through the sieve to strain it of remaining solids. Let cool to room temperature then chill in the refrigerator.

One the stock has chilled, any fat remaining will have risen to the top and solidified. The fat forms a protective layer against bacteria while the stock is in the refrigerator. If you plan to freeze the stock however, remove and discard the fat, pour the stock into a jar or plastic container. (You can also remove the fat, and boil the stock down, concentrating it so that it doesn’t take as much storage space.) Leave an inch head room from the top of the stock to the top of the jar, so that as the stock freezes and expands, it will not break the container.

Makes about 4 quarts.

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About ALM Tree

Bachelor's degree in biology-chemistry; Masters in public health. Science nerd (and proud of it!). Wine-o, beer snob, and foodie! Always has a sense of humor and looks on the bright side.
This entry was posted in Corn-Free, Dairy-Free, Egg-Free, Fructose-Free, Meals Under $5, Nut-Free, Paleo/Primitive - Safe, Recipes, Soy-Free, Sugar-Free. Bookmark the permalink.

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